Events

Investing for 2-Degrees: How Can Investors Make the Transition?

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The SFU Centre for Corporate Governance and Sustainability, and the Shareholder Association for Research and Education (SHARE) invite you to attend a special learning and networking event on the topic of “Investing for 2-Degrees: How can investors make the transition?” This evening event will feature experts from the 2-Degree Investing Initiative, the Fonds de solidarité and the B.C. Investment Management Corporation (bcIMC) who will share their strategies for aligning their investment portfolios with the transition to a low-carbon economy. The discussion will also feature a response panel to help participants reflect on some viable steps that their own investment organizations can take to address climate change.

Date: February 21st, 2018 evening

Time: 5:00pm – 8:00pm

Location: Segal Graduate School (500 Granville Street)

Inquiries: beedie-events@sfu.ca

Registration: Click here

Program:

5:00pm REGISTRATION AND RECEPTION
5:30pm WELCOME AND OPENING REMARKS

Peter Chapman, Executive Director, SHARE
Dr. Ali Dastmalchian, Dean, Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University
Phuong Huynh, ESG Analyst and Proxy Voter, SIAS Student Fund

5:40pm INTRODUCTION AND FRAMING FOR CONVERSATION

Dr. Andy Hoffman, Holcim Professor of Sustainable Enterprise, University of Michigan

5:50pm INITIATIVES PANEL: CURRENT INVESTOR INITIATIVES FOR SUPPORTING THE 2°TRANSITION

Climate Alignment Pilot Tests
Stan Dupré, Founder and CEO, 2° Investing Initiative

bcIMC Climate Change Strategy
Jennifer Coulson, Senior Manager, ESG Integration, bcIMC

Fonds de solidarité FTQ Climate Change Strategy
Mario Tremblay, Vice-President, Public and Corporate Affairs, Fonds de solidarité FTQ

6:45pm RESPONSE PANEL: PRACTICAL STEPS FOR INVESTORS TO SUPPORT THE 2° TRANSITION

Key Considerations for Developing a Climate Change Strategy 
Shannon Rohan, Director of Responsible Investment, SHARE

Addressing Carbon in ESG Integration: Experience from SFU Student Funds
Glenn Powers, Faculty Advisor, BEAM and SIAS Portfolios, SFU

Reflections from a Pension Fund Trustee
Dr. Stephanie Bertels, Trustee and Co-Chair, SFU Academic Pension Plan

7:00pm QUESTIONS AND DISCUSSIONS
7:20pm CLOSING REMARKS
7:30pm COFFEE AND DESSERT

How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate

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February 13th Evening Event (Organized by Beedie NetImpact Chapter)

Location: Segal Graduate School (500 Granville Street)
4th floor (Room 4800)
Time: 5:30pm – 8:00pm
Registration: Click here
Scientists have documented the processes and impacts by which human activity is changing the climate. And yet surveys show that the Americans are still divided on this issue.  In the past U.S. election, climate change was a wedge issue on a par with abortion. Why is this so? Why do such large numbers of Americans reject the consensus of the scientific community? To answer this question, we must examine how people’s opinions on this and other complex scientific issues are based on their prior ideological preferences, personal experience, and values—all of which are heavily influenced by their referent groups and their individual psychology. Physical scientists may set the parameters for understanding the technical aspects of the climate debate, but they do not have the final word on whether society accepts or even understands their conclusions. We must acknowledge that the debate over climate change, like almost all environmental issues, is a debate over culture, worldviews, and ideology. In this way, it has become enmeshed in the so-called culture wars, much like other “cultural” issues that divide the electorate (abortion, gun control, health care, and evolution).
Andrew (Andy) Hoffman is the Holcim (US) Professor of Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan; where he studies the processes by which environmental issues both emerge and evolve as social, political and managerial issues and the corporate responses that have emerged as a result of those pressures, particularly around the issue of climate change.  He has published over 100 articles/book chapters, as well as 14 books, which have been translated into five languages. He also writes about the role of academic scholars in public and political discourse.  His work has been covered in numerous media outlets, including the New York Times, Scientific American, Time, the Wall Street Journal, National Geographic, Atlantic and National Public Radio.

Academia’s Emerging Crisis of Relevance and the Consequent Role of the Engaged Scholar

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Academia’s Emerging Crisis of Relevance and the Consequent Role of the Engaged Scholar

Please join us for a discussion about the role of engaged scholarship with visiting scholar, Dr. Andrew (Andy) Hoffman.

Universities are facing a crisis of relevance. While there are multiple reasons for this to be happening, one that deserves particular attention is the extent to which academic scholars do not see it as their role to engage in public and political discourse. However, increased engagement is unavoidable in an emerging educational context where the caliber of public discourse has become so degraded and social media is changing the nature of science and scientific discourse within society. Further, there is a demographic shift in play, where young scholars are seeking more impact from their work than their more senior colleagues.

In this presentation, Andy will talk about what we know and what we don’t know about the evolving role of the engaged scholar. First, why should academic scholars engage in public and political discourse? Second, how can we structure a set of ground rules that could form what might be considered a handbook for public engagement?

Join us in a lively conversation that reexamines how we practice our craft, to what purpose and for which audiences.


Date:
Thursday February 1, 2018
Time:
2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Location:
Segal Graduate School of Business
500 Granville Street, Vancouver, BC
Room:
Room 2300 (2nd floor)
Cost:
Complimentary, RSVP required.
Registration:
Please register here.
Inquiries:
beedie-events@sfu.ca.

Andrew (Andy) Hoffman is the Holcim (US) Professor of Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan; where he studies the processes by which environmental issues both emerge and evolve as social, political and managerial issues and the corporate responses that have emerged as a result of those pressures, particularly around the issue of climate change. He has published over 100 articles/book chapters, as well as 14 books, which have been translated into five languages. He also writes about the role of academic scholars in public and political discourse. His work has been covered in numerous media outlets, including the New York Times, Scientific American, Time, the Wall Street Journal, National Geographic, Atlantic and National Public Radio.