News & Events

Brown Bag Research Discussion – When the feeling is right: The role of affect in mothers’ return to work decisions

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Abstract: Women represent half of the population, however, they are still underrepresented in leadership positions and overrepresented in part-time and precarious employment. One reason for this pertaining inequality is the need for women to decide if and how to continue their career once they (plan to) start a family as they still hold the main responsibility for childcare in the majority of countries. In this project, we focus on women’s decision-making regarding the timing and conditions of their return to work after the first child was born as this is one important factor determining their future career development. More specifically, building on affective events theory and appraisal theory, we aim to analyze which factors shape women’s affect toward their return and how their affect eventually influences their decision-making.

When/whereOctober 10 (Wednesday), 2:30 pm, Segal 4805

Bio: Dr. Anna Katharina Bader is Assistant Professor of Human Resource Management and Asian Business at the University of Goettingen, Germany. Katharina’s research focusses on the effects of individual differences in organizations, in particular cultural and gender differences, and her special interest lies in international and comparative studies. She has lived and worked in several countries including India and Japan. Her studies have been published in international, peer-reviewed journals and she has received several awards for her work. Before her academic career, she gained experience in the private sector where she worked as a leadership development manager and a trainer.

Register here

For inquiries, email Centre Director Mila Lazarova mbl@sfu.ca

Leadership in the Age of Digitalization

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Tuesday, October 02 – Tuesday, October 02, 2018
2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. PDT
Free. Register here.
beedie-events@sfu.ca

Dr. Benjamin Bader is currently Beedie Family Visiting Fellow at SFU. He also is Professor of Strategic Management and Organization at the Leuphana University of Lüneburg and will be joining Newcastle University Business School as a Senior Lecturer in International HRM in fall 2019.

He studied Business Administration at the Friedrich-Alexander Universität of Erlangen-Nürnberg as well as at the American University in Washington, DC. He was awarded his Doctorate Degree with distinction (summa cum laude) at the University of Hamburg. Benjamin also successfully finished a vocational training as a sales representative (Industriekaufmann) and currently is a Strategic Advisor to the RES Forum.

Benjamin’s research interests include expatriate management, leadership, and the impact of digitalization in an occupational context. His work has been published in peer-reviewed journals, and he is currently serving as an Associate Editor at the International Journal of Human Resource Management. Starting in 2019, he is appointed to be an Associate Editor at the Journal of International Management.

Safeguarding Employee Morale under Conditions of (Secret) Workplace Inequalities: Ambiguity as Strategy

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Safeguarding Employee Morale under Conditions of (Secret) Workplace Inequalities:
Ambiguity as Strategy
We propose a new way of seeing the effects of organizational secrecy on employee reactions to workplace inequalities by bringing in key insights borrowed from communication science-i.e., that not all uncertainty management necessarily requires the reduction of uncertainty, and that ambiguity can be a more effective and desirable communication strategy than transparency or secrecy.

Across four studies-a qualitative multiple-case study, two survey studies, and an experiment-we show that several dimensions underlie the secrecy/transparency dichotomy, each of which exerting a separate influence on employee morale: concealment (vs. disclosure), intended ambiguity (vs. clarity), and perceived ambiguity (vs. clarity). Moreover, we report evidence for an apparent preference of ambiguity over clarity when it comes to workplace inequalities, both on the side of organizations and employees. Our findings offer a potential explanation for conflicting and unexpected findings in earlier studies on the effects of secrecy on employee morale.

We conclude with an ethical analysis of the secrecy/transparency dilemma, relating this phenomenon not only to organizational practice but also to research, as fully debriefing respondents in field studies of organizational secrets is often not possible.


Date:
Tuesday, September 18, 2018
Time:
1:30pm – 3:00pm
Location:
Segal Graduate School of Business
500 Granville Street, Vancouver, BC
Room 2300 (2nd floor)
Cost:
Complimentary, RSVP required.
Registration:
Please register here.
Inquiries:
beedie-events@sfu.ca.

Nicky Dries is a Research Professor (i.e., tenured Associate Professor with a focus on research-BOFZAP) at the KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business (Belgium), and a Full Professor at BI Norwegian Business School in Oslo, Norway. She is also a Research Fellow at Vlerick Business School (Belgium). She conducted her doctoral research on talent management and (subjective) career success at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium), during which time she was also a visiting scholar at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (the Netherlands). She obtained her doctoral degree in December of 2009, after which she took up a postdoc position at the KU Leuven. Since then, she has been a visiting scholar at the University of Tilburg (the Netherlands), at Wirtschaftsuniversität Vienna (Austria), at Reykjavik University (Iceland), at IESE (Barcelona), at BI Norwegian Business School (Oslo), and at TUM München (Germany).
In addition, Nicky was a Fulbright scholar at Boston University School of Management (US) in 2012. Nicky has published articles in international journals in the areas of career management, human resource management, and industrial-organizational psychology. She is an Associate Editor at Applied Psychology: An International Review, and is on the editorial boards of Journal of Vocational Behavior (JVB), Journal of World Business (JW)), and European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology (EJWOP). She is an evaluator for the Research Foundation-Flanders (FWO), as a member of Expert Panel G&M3: Psychology, Pedagogy, Didactics and Social Work, and for the Academy of Finland’s Strategic Research Council (SRC) as a member of the Expert Panel Knowledge, Know-how and the Changing Working Life. In 2016, Nicky was selected to be featured on AcademiaNet, the European database of leading women in science.

Nicky’s primary research interests are employee talent, potential, and success-and more broadly, the interplay of organizational-strategic and individual-psychological factors in shaping careers. She is frequently invited to lecture on these topics nationally and internationally, both in the academic and the business world. To date, she has been the main supervisor of five, and co-supervisor of two, doctoral research projects on talent management, as well as a co-supervisor of the Flemish Policy Research Centre Work and Social Economy (Steunpunt Werk en Sociale Economie). Nicky is an active member of the two largest cross-cultural projects within the field of career studies, i.e. 5C (Consortium for the Cross-Cultural Study of Contemporary Careers) and the Career Adaptability/Life Design project.

Mitigating Employee Silence: The Effect of OHS Leading Indicators and the Mediating Role of Burnout

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Date: Monday, October 3rd, 2016
Time: 3:30pm – 5:00pm
Location: Segal Graduate School
500 Granville Street, Vancouver
Room 2300
RSVP: Please reserve a spot by registering here.
Inquiries: Please contact beedie-events@sfu.ca
Increasingly, organisations are focusing on proactive occupational health and safety (OHS) practices, labelled ‘leading indicators’, to protect workers from injury or illness. Drawing upon Conservation of Resources theory (COR), we examine the role of leading indicators of OHS practices in reducing negative outcomes such as burnout (work-related psychological fatigue and exhaustion) and employee silence. We focus on acquiescent silence, defined as the passive withholding of relevant ideas due to submission and resignation. According to COR theory, acquiescent silence is associated with burnout. Currently, little is known about the mechanisms by which OHS leading indicators mitigate negative outcomes. We hypothesise that OHS leading indicators would be negatively related to employee silence. In addition, we hypothesise that burnout would mediate this relationship.

We surveyed 4,750 teachers in Australia using a self-report online questionnaire. Pre-validated, multi-item measures of OHS leading indicators, burnout, and employee silence were utilised. Data were analysed using mediated regression and bias-corrected bootstrapping of the indirect effect.

The results of confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the study measures demonstrated construct validity. As hypothesised, OHS leading indicators were negatively related to employee silence. Also, consistent with expectations, bias-corrected bootstrapping showed that burnout partially mediated the negative effects of OHS leading indicators on employee silence.

Our study shows that OHS leading indicators ameliorate negative employee outcomes such as burnout and silence. We also identify a mechanism through which OHS leading indicators encourage employees to speak up and voice their health and safety concerns. Our findings are consistent with the key tenet of COR theory that, when employees are under stress, they will conserve resources by withholding OHS-relevant ideas, concerns, and information. In terms of practical implications, our findings highlight the benefits of organisations investing in OHS leading indicators to mitigate burnout and, in turn, discourage employee silence.

Helen De Cieri Helen De Cieri (PhD) is a Professor at Monash Business School, Monash University, Australia. Over the past thirty years, Helen has researched and published on topics related to strategic and international HRM, employee health, safety and well being, and organisational performance. She has taught and researched in China, USA, Malaysia and Europe, as well as Australia. Helen is an associate editor for Human Resource Management and has served on several editorial boards including Academy of Management Journal, HRM Review, Journal of International Business Studies, and Journal of Management. In addition to her academic work, Helen is an ambassador for the 100% Project, a non-profit organization that works for the advancement of women in Australian workplaces.

Are We on the Same Page? The Development of Trust in Chinese-German Subordinate-Supervisor Relations

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Date: Tuesday, October 4th, 2016
Time: 1:30pm – 3:00pm
Location: Segal Graduate School
500 Granville Street, Vancouver
Room 2300
RSVP: Please reserve a spot by registering here.
Inquiries: Please contact beedie-events@sfu.ca
Enriching interpersonal cross-cultural trust literature with acculturation theory, this explorative, qualitative study reveals why, how and under which circumstances (collectivist) Chinese subordinates either succeed or fail in forming and developing trust to their (individualist) German supervisors. The analysis is based on 95 semi-structured interviews with Chinese subordinates of German supervisors and German supervisors of Chinese subordinates both in China and in Germany. This study uncovers a three phase process model (comprising the contact, disillusion and acculturation phase), ultimately resulting in either establishment or erosion of trust. The findings disclose that central propositions of seminal (Western) trust concepts are turned upside down, once the focus moves from an exclusively Western cultural setting to one that also includes East Asian contexts. As such, this study exposes important boundary conditions of influential trust concepts and contributes to research on the juxtaposition of Western and Eastern management concepts.
Professor Markus Pudelko is Director of the Department of International Business at Tübingen University School of Business and Economics and Vice Dean as well as Associate Dean for International Affairs of the Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences.
He earned Master degrees in Business Studies (University of Cologne), Economics (Sorbonne University) and International Management (Community of European Management Schools – CEMS) and a PhD (University of Cologne).
Before joining Tübingen University, he worked for eight years for the University of Edinburgh Business School. For longer-term research purposes he visits frequently other universities, such as Columbia University, Doshisha University, Fudan University, IESE, Korea University, Melbourne University, Peking University, San José State University, Sophia University, Stellenbosch University, Umea University, Vaasa University and Waseda University.
His current research is on headquarters-subsidiary relationships, multinational teams, the impact of language on international business, trust, international and comparative HRM and cross-cultural management. He has published on these topics in books, book chapters and journals such as Academy of Management Journal, Journal of International Business Studies, Human Resource Management, Leadership Quarterly, Long Range Planning, Journal of World Business, Organizational Dynamics and International Journal of Human Resource Management. He received several research awards, among others by the Academy of Management and the Academy of International Business.

When do Multicultural Employees Broker Across Cultures? A Mixed-Method Approach

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Date: Thursday, February 11th, 2016
Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm Presentation & QA
Location: Segal Graduate School
500 Granville Street, Vancouver
Room 2800
RSVP: Please reserve a spot by registering here.
Inquiries: Please contact beedie-events@sfu.ca
Cultural brokering is the act of facilitating cross-cultural interactions among others. In a three study, mixed-methods project, we develop a phenomena-driven scale to measure cultural brokering. Multicultural individuals – people who identify with more than one culture – are found to broker across cultures more frequently than monoculturals, who identify with one culture. In addition, we find that brokering varies depending on the cultural diversity of the organization. Multicultural individuals only engage in significantly more brokering behavior than monocultural individuals when working in organizations with low levels of cultural diversity, indicating these organizations may gain the most from employing multicultural individuals.
Stacey R Fitzsimmons (Ph.D. Beedie School of Business) joined University of Victoria’s Gustavson School of Business in 2014, after three years as an Assistant Professor at Western Michigan University. Her research objective is to improve the way people work with others across cultures. She does this by examining how bicultural and multicultural employees contribute to global teams and organizations. Stacey’s research has been published in Academy of Management Review, Human Resource Management Review, Organization Studies, and Organizational Dynamics. She won the 2013 International Human Resources Scholarly Research award from the Academy of Management, for most significant annual contribution to international human resources management.

Contingency Effects of National Culture and Institutions on How Social Networks Influence Individual Creativity

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This talk is presented in partnership with the Jack Austin Centre for Asia Pacific Business Studies.

Date: Wednesday, December 9th, 2015
Time: 10:30am – 12:00pm Presentation & QA
Location: Segal Graduate School
500 Granville Street, Vancouver
Room 2800 (2nd floor)
RSVP: Please reserve a spot by registering here.
Inquiries: Please contact beedie-events@sfu.ca
 

Abstract
While the role of social networks in organizations has received considerable attention, researchers have paid less attention to how national culture and institutional differences across countries influence network mechanisms. To help fill this gap, we examine how a host country’s national cultural and institutional contexts influence the relationship between an individual’s social network (ties and position) and creativity in a multinational organization. Using hierarchical linear modeling, a test of hypotheses is conducted based on unique sociocentric data from one multinational organization of 1698 individuals (1436 respondents) in 28 subsidiaries across 17 countries around the world. Results suggest that national culture (individualism-collectivism) and institutional context (regulative institutions) significantly impact this relationship. Our findings call into question the feasibility to generalize social network theories across different macro-contexts.

Dr Carl F Fey is a Professor of International Business at Aalto University School of Business in Helsinki, Finland. Until October 2015 he served as Dean of Nottingham University Business School China, the Director of Executive Education and a Chaired Professor of International Business. Under Fey’s leadership NUBS China placed a focus on quality education and research focusing around the three Is of International, Innovative, and Interactive and grew to have about 2500 students and a faculty of 90 coming from 28 countries around the world (Fey hired over 55 long-term faculty and over 20 full-time visiting faculty during his 4.5 year deanship). Prior to joining Nottingham University Business School China he was a Professor at Stockholm School of Economics in Sweden where among other responsibilities he helped the school start and develop a branch campus in Russia which became a leader in business education in Russia for executive education and EMBA programs on which the school focused. Dr Fey obtained his PhD at the University of Western Ontario’s Richard Ivey School of Business in Canada.

Most of Dr Fey’s research focuses on understanding how cultural and institutional differences between countries require adaption of management theory and practice for success in the transforming economies of China and Russia. More specifically, Dr Fey’s research focuses on international aspects organizational culture and effectiveness, leadership, strategic human resource management, foreign market entry, mergers and acquisitions, and knowledge transfer. Dr Fey has published over 45 articles in various academic journals including the Journal of International Business Studies, Strategic Management Journal, and Organization Science. Fey has also published articles in many managerially-oriented outlets such as the Wall Street Journal. He received 2013 Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS) Decade Award for the paper Minbaeva, D., Pedersen, T., Björkman, I., Fey, C. F., & Park, H. J. 2003. MNC knowledge transfer, subsidiary absorptive capacity and HRM. Fey is a sought-after teacher (focusing on International Business, international management, Leadership, and Organizational Behavior) who is especially experienced in selling, designing, directing, and delivering executive education programs.

5C Research Group Meeting

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Date: August 5 – 6, 2015
Location: Simon Fraser University at Harbour Centre, 515 W Hastings St, Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3

The annual meeting of the  ‘Cross-Cultural Collaboration on Contemporary Careers’ (5C) group – a collaboration of careers scholars from around 30 countries. The Cross-Cultural Collaboration on Contemporary Careers (5C) is a world-wide project aimed at studying careers across various countries and cultures. The main goal of the project is to understand what defines career success and drives career transitions, exploring the individual, organizational, social and structural factors that impact on them. The results of this study will have important implications for practice and particularly for all those professionals concerned with career management.

5CAnnual Meeting
5CAnnual Meeting 2

How Minority Unionism Works in New Zealand

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Date: Monday, July 20th, 2015
Time: 10:30am – 12:00pm Presentation & QA
Location: Segal Graduate School

500 Granville Street, Vancouver

Room 2800

RSVP: Please reserve a spot by registering here.
Inquiries: Please contact beedie-events@sfu.ca
This presentation examines New Zealand’s experience with minority and multiple unionism, as it has developed under that country’s Employment Relations Act 2000. In particular, the consequences of New Zealand’s system for employers and employees are explored. Comparisons with Canada are made throughout. Particular attention is drawn to the key lessons of New Zealand’s experiences, especially given recent Supreme Court freedom of association decisions which have potentially called into question certain aspects of Canada’s labour relations framework.
Mark Harcourt is a professor in, and co-chair of, the Department of Strategy and HRM at the Waikato Management School, University of the Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. Mark holds a PhD from the University of Alberta, Masters of Industrial Relations from the University of Toronto, and Bachelor of Commerce from Queen’s. Mark’s research has covered a number of areas in HRM, including performance appraisal, health and safety, discrimination, and recruitment via online social media. However, in recent years, his research has focused primarily on employee representation and dismissal. Mark has published more than 50 articles in various journals such as the British Journal of Industrial Relations, Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Industrial Relations, International Journal of Human Resource Management, and Journal of Business Ethics. Mark teaches HRM courses mainly at the MBA, MMS, and upper-year undergraduate levels.

HSBC Bank Canada and Teck win SFU diversity awards

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From left to right: Dr. Nancy McKinstry, Sandra Stuart, COO, HSBC Bank Canada and Beedie School of Business Dean Dr. Blaize Horner Reich

From left to right: Dr. Nancy McKinstry, Sandra Stuart, COO, HSBC Bank Canada and Beedie School of Business Dean Dr. Blaize Horner Reich

 

A trio of awards recognizing outstanding efforts in promoting diversity in business were presented today at the Simon Fraser University 2014 Nancy McKinstry Awards for Leadership in Diversity. (more…)