Past Events

Bridging the Global Digital Divide – Using Mobile Technology for Better Decisions in Mining and Manufacturing Contexts

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Digital connectivity is reshaping how we live, work and rest. However, the global digital divide means up to 4 billion people around the world remain largely offline due to the accessibility and affordability barriers of the internet. The effect is that these voices are underrepresented in decision-making and their feedback is rarely captured. Yet those excluded are often the most heavily impacted by the globalized economy: people who make the clothes we wear, pick the vegetables we eat, or suffer the consequences of large mining operations that source the minerals that power our cellphones.

Join us on March 27th for a session where we will share practical methods and the results of research deploying mobile technology tools based on voice calls and text messages, to connect to those most underrepresented stakeholders (community members, workers), to ensure social and ethical compliance in global supply chains and participation in environmental and social impact assessments

We will present two case studies: 1. the use of mobile information-sharing and reporting of social and environmental risk in the mining context (from Peru), and 2. the monitoring of working conditions in manufacturing factories to ensure compliance with local and international labour and human rights laws (from China and South Africa).


Date:
Tuesday, February 27, 2018
Time:
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Location:
Morris J Wosk Centre for Dialogue
Room 470, 580 West Hastings Street
(enter via Seymour Street courtyard entrance)
Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 1L6
Cost:
Complimentary, RSVP required.
Registration:
Please register here.
Inquiries:
beedie-events@sfu.ca.

Vera Belazelkoska is the Director of Programs and Partnerships at Ulula, where she works with clients and partners from the private, public and civil society sectors in the design and implementation of stakeholder engagement and social risk assessment systems for the protection of human rights in global supply chains. Vera has directed projects in the extractive, manufacturing and seafood sectors in Peru, Mexico, South Africa, China, and is leading Ulula’s independent project on monitoring of working conditions in garment and textile production hubs in India.
Vera has 10+ years of experience in international development, where she focused on poverty alleviation, financial inclusion and education in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America. She was a Rotary International Peace Scholar in Argentina and holds a Masters in Political Economy of International Development from the University of Toronto. She has spoken at various conferences, such as the Canadian Association of Latin American and Caribbean Studies, the Asia Inspection Ethical Compliance Conference in Hong Kong, and EDIT Expo for Design Innovation and Technology. She is passionate about leveraging accessible digital technologies to amplify the voices of workers and communities worldwide for the advancement of transparent, responsible and ethical business operations.
Ulula is a software and analytics platform that helps organizations monitor human rights abuses across global supply chains, leveraging accessible digital technologies. Ulula is a social enterprise based at the IBM Innovation Space in Toronto, and was recently awarded the Best Social Enterprise by InnovateTO. Ulula is one of two ventures funded by Working Capital – a venture fund by Humanity United that accelerates supply chain innovations to enable corporations to operate more transparently and ethically worldwide.
Dr. June Francis is an Associate Professor in the Beedie School of Business and Director of the Institute for Diaspora Research and Engagement at SFU. She is the Co-Lead of Co-Laboratorio PerÚ, where she works to strengthen cross-sector collaboration and the role of universities as engaged development and innovation partners, for inclusive growth. Her research interests lie at the intersection of development, poverty alleviation and international business, with a specific focus on collaborative governance and inclusive business strategies related to natural resources sector, gender and racialized inclusion in governance and nontraditional intellectual property law related to community well-being and cultural and human rights.
Previous work also included evaluating the determinants of export success for information technology and high technology firms. June won the Canada Trust Teaching Award 2014 for teaching excellence. A former player with the Jamaican netball squad, June has coached the BC netball team to the Canadian tournament. June is currently a member of SFU’s Board of Governors, The Hogan’s Alley Working Group and the Board Co-chair of the Hogan’s Alley Society. Co-Laboratorio PerÚ is a multi-year $1.5Million project funded by Global Affairs Canada through the Canadian International Resources and Development Institute, CIRDI. Co-lead by Dr. June Francis and Dr. Kristina Henriksson, Co-Lab PerÚ strengthens cross-sector collaboration, learning and innovation —for more inclusive resilient solutions in resource sector governance, policies and industry practice. The Co-Lab works with private, public and civil society partners in Peru and Canada, embedding activities with local universities.
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Digital Nomads: The Age of the Fully Distributed Workplace is Upon Us

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In recent years major technology organizations have seesawed back and forth between fully embracing work-from-home (WFH) options for employees and mandating presence during office hours (e.g., Marisa Meyer’s sweeping proclamation for Yahoo employees). The arguments are strong and sometimes heated on both sides. Among other points raised, it is argued that technical employees in particular are more productive while working at home. Conversely, many employees (and particularly leaders) complain of graveyard offices in Silicon Valley — extraordinarily expensive and carefully-designed work spaces that are seldom used. It may be that a wave is building which will change the entire conversation. A handful of technology organizations are experimenting with large-scale remote work functions or entirely remote workforces. As the popularity of distributed work rises alongside options such as WeWork, are we seeing the birth of a new work reality — the digital nomads?

Date:
Monday August 14, 2017
Time:
9:00 am – 10:00 am
Location:
Segal Graduate School of Business
500 Granville Street, Vancouver, BC
Room 4800 (4th floor)
Cost:
Complimentary, RSVP required.
Registration:
Please register here.
Inquiries:
beedie-events@sfu.ca.

Dr. Mark Frein is a former Adjunct Professor at Simon Fraser University and served as an Executive Director in the Segal Graduate School of Business’s Learning Strategies Group. He has extensive experience in professional services industries, having created two consulting companies and led one to accolades in Canada as one of the fastest-growing firms in the country. In the last five years, Dr. Frein has been an executive at two industry-leading, venture-backed SaaS startups: Return Path, and now InVision App. InVision is a 100% distributed workforce with almost 400 employees worldwide.

CPA Innovation Centre – P-hacking: Scholarly dishonesty in response to publication pressures

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Date: Monday, May 29th, 2017
Time: 10:30am -12:00pm Presentation & QA; 12:00pm – 1:00pm Lunch
Location: Room 2300 (2nd floor)
Segal Graduate School
500 Granville Street, Vancouver
Link: Click here to register

Management scholars face a highly nonlinear reward system based on top-tier publication. Many research-oriented schools of business and management have norms regarding a target number of publications in specific journals required for tenure, assessing scholarly performance primarily by counting a researcher’s published articles and weighing them by the impact factor of the journals in which they appear, and secondarily by certifying the substance of their contribution.

Many argue that these rewards tempt researchers to disregard negative and nonsignificant findings in favor of selectively collecting and analyzing data in a search for significant findings in support of accumulating publications in prestigious journals, which disproportionately publish statistically significant results (e.g., Bettis 2012). Evidence suggests that such behavior is widespread.

We examine adoption of a research practice that promotes statistically significant positive findings, p-hacking, which entails selectively omitting or including variables, observations, and/or statistical analyses until nonsignificant results become significant at standard levels (Simmons et al. 2011). We examine p-hacking in one and two-author articles published between 2000 and 2016 in two highly selective, top-tier management publications, the Academy of Management Journal, and Administrative Science Quarterly.


Dr Joel Baum, Ph.D is a Professor at the University of Toronto Rotman School of Management and the George E. Connell Chair in Organizations and Society. He sits on the editorial board of Strategic Management Journal and is founding Co-editor of Strategic Organization. Recent awards include Most Impactful Article, Journal of Business Venturing (2010) and Organization and Management Theory Distinguished Scholar, Academy of Management (2011). Joel teaches courses on Competitive Strategy and Strategic Organization. He studies the influence of interfirm competition and cooperation on firm behavior and performance in industries including investment banking, biotechnology, and private military services.

What and How Entrepreneurial Startups Learn: Identifying the Types of Knowledge that Flow Through Network Ties

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Using qualitative data from China, this study advances a content-oriented approach of social network research that builds upon the dominant composition-oriented approach to provide a more comprehensive picture of the utility of networks. Drawing on six cases of private start-ups in the Chinese synthetic dye industry, we identify eight types of knowledge that flow through entrepreneur-incumbent networks during the foundation of start-ups and explore how and why variation in the knowledge obtained produces significant differences in start-ups’ long-term performance. Abstracting the eight types into two general categories of functional knowledge and strategic knowledge, we find that it is the reception of strategic, not functional knowledge, that shapes start-ups’ long-term competitiveness. We show that possessing technical knowledge during the founding period – which is one type of functional knowledge – is necessary for short-term success but not sufficient for long-term success of new ventures. Our findings show that performance implications of networks hinge significantly on the precise knowledge that flows through them, contributing to a more nuanced explanation of how social networks affect entrepreneurial firm performance.

 

Date:
Wednesday, March 15, 2017
Time:
10:30am – 12:00pm Presentation & QA
12:00pm – 1:00pm Lunch
Location:
Segal Graduate School
500 Granville Street, Vancouver
Room 2300 (2nd floor)
Inquiries:
Please contact beedie-events@sfu.ca

 

JohannPeterMurmann
Johann Peter Murmann is Professor of Strategic Management at the AGSM – UNSW Australia Business School. He was Visiting Associate Professor of Management at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania during the academic years 2011/12 and 2012/13. Before joining the AGSM – UNSW Australia Business School in January 2006, he was on the faculty of Northwestern University¹s Kellogg School of Management (from 1997 to 2005). He has lectured widely on the comparative case study method, giving tutorials at Academy of Management meetings, the Wharton School, Alto University, the University of Lille, and other institutions. He is a senior editor of the journal Management and Organization Review. One key focus in his research has been the development of the synthetic dye industry from 1850 to current times. His book ‘Knowledge and Competitive Advantage: The Coevolution of Firms, Technology and National Institutions’ received the 2004 Joseph Schumpeter Prize and 2004 Stanley Reiter Best Paper Award at the Kellogg School of Management. Most recently, he co-edited the book “China’s Innovation Challenge” that was published both by Cambridge and Peking University Press. Professor Murmann received a BA in Philosophy with honors from the University of California at Berkeley and a Masters and PhD degree with distinction in Management of Organizations (1998) from Columbia University. More details Professor Murmann can be found at professor-murmann.net.

Manufacturing the Future through 3D Printing

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Abstract
3D printing (also known in professional circles as “additive manufacturing”) is transforming the industrial landscape, changing where and how manufacturing is taking place. From the high-end metal additive manufacturing technologies that are being used in aerospace, to the types of lower-end consumer 3D printers that have been launched on crowdfunding platforms such as Kickstarter, 3D printing is making it possible for new applications to be developed, new markets to be entered, and new customers to be served. In this seminar, Simon discusses how 3D printing is changing the manufacturing system, the sustainability and entrepreneurship opportunities that 3D printing is creating, and the educational needs that must be addressed if its potential is to be fully realised.
Date:
Tuesday, December 13, 2016
Time:
10:30am – 12:00pm Presentation & QA
12:00pm – 1:00pm Lunch
Location:
Segal Graduate School
500 Granville Street, Vancouver
Room 2800 (2nd floor)
Inquiries:
Please contact beedie-events@sfu.ca
SimonFord
Simon Ford is a Beedie Family Visiting Fellow and Visiting Associate Professor at Simon Fraser University for the 2016-17 academic year, and a Senior Research Associate at the Institute for Manufacturing at the University of Cambridge. He is passionate about innovation, entrepreneurship and sustainability. His recent projects have focused on the emergence of 3D printing, its effects on sustainability, and how it affects the distribution of manufacturing activity. He is also a strong advocate of experiential learning and is a developer and facilitator of serious games on the topics of new product development, technology roadmapping, and technology acquisition. His work has been published in journals such as Technological Forecasting & Social Change, R&D Management, Journal of Cleaner Production, International Journal of Production Research, and Research-Technology Management.

Sixth Beedie Innovation Conference

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Sixth Beedie Innovation Conference

On September 29th, the CPA Innovation Centre is hosting the Sixth Beedie Innovation Conference. This is a one-day conference for Beedie School of Business researchers to share, connect and learn about each other’s work and ideas on innovation. Also participating in the conference will be Tania Bubela from University of Alberta. Tania is a Professor and Associate Dean (Research) in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the School of Public Health. Her current research focuses on intellectual property issues and other legal and ethical issues in health and agricultural biotechnology and biomedical research more broadly.

Date: Thursday, September 29, 2016
Time: 9:15am – 5:30pm
Location: Segal Graduate School, 500 Granville Street, Vancouver
Room 2300 (2nd floor)
Inquiries: Please contact beedie-events@sfu.ca

Draft Conference Schedule

9:15am – 10:00am Paper session 1: Jon Thomas – “The Role of Star Scientists in University Spin-off Emergence”
10:00am – 10:45am Paper session 2: Pek-Hooi Soh – “Innovation Ecosystem Strategy”
10:45am – 11:00am Break
11:00am – 12:00pm Invited session 1 Tania Bubela (University of Alberta) – “Lessons in university intellectual property management: The secret to survivin’ or a train bound for nowhere?”

View the presentation slides here.

12:00pm – 1:00pm Lunch
1:00pm – 1:45pm Paper session 3: Monica Semeniuk – “Wanted: Innovators”

View the presentation slides here

1:45pm – 2:30pm Paper session 4: Elicia Maine – “Patenting Strategy of Biomedical University Spinoffs: What Role Do Technology Transfer Offices Play?”
2:30pm – 2:45pm Break
2:45pm – 3:30pm Paper session 5: Tao Wang – “Silence is golden: The virtue of instant messaging in a community of entrepreneurs”
3:30pm – 4:15pm Paper session 6: Sarah Lubik  – “Update on the Canadian Innovation Agenda”
4:15pm – 5:30pm Conference Social

 

Flat and Open: The Rise of Radical Transparency and De-structured Supervision in Contemporary Organizations.

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Abstract
Technology firms such as Zappos have garnered extensive media coverage for “holocratic” or anti-hierarchical organizational structures. There are many other firms within emerging technology sectors but also traditional industries that are exploring non-standard organizational forms. What is all the buzz about and are these organizational forms here to stay or fanciful and temporary expressions of their entrepreneurial founders’ interests in breaking norms?
Date:
Friday, August 5th, 2016
Time:
11:00am – 12:00pm Presentation & QA
Followed by a light lunch
Location:
Segal Graduate School
500 Granville Street, Vancouver
Room 2800 (2nd floor)
Inquiries:
Please contact beedie-events@sfu.ca
PierreBerthon

Mark Frein joined Return Path in 2013 as SVP, People to lead the development of Return Path’s organizational structure and culture as the company expands into new markets and regions.

As a founder and CEO of a prominent professional services consultancy specializing in organizational development, Mark has guided an array of successful companies, including his own, through the unique challenges presented by rapid growth and international expansion. His holistic approach to identifying and nurturing individual talent, building and strengthening teams, and designing management structures to create positive, high-performing environments will help Return Path maintain the identify and values that create a business advantage as we grow.

Mark holds an M.A. in Philosophy of Education and a Ph.D. in Education from the University of British Columbia.

Innovations in Marketing and New Perspectives on Consumer Behaviour

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Date:
Friday, June 17, 2016
Time:
10:00am – 12:00pm Presentation & QA
Location:
Segal Graduate School
500 Granville Street, Vancouver
Room 2300 (2nd floor)
Registration:
Please reserve a spot by registering here.
Inquiries:
Please contact beedie-events@sfu.ca

Somewhere Out There: The Power of Brands to Signify Safety and Represent Home during Risk-Filled Separations 

Abstract
While past research has focused on the many complexities surrounding consumers’ relationships with objects and brands, less focus has been placed on how consumers use brands within their real life interpersonal relationships, or specifically how brands connect consumers beyond shared affinity. Our research seeks to understand the manner in which consumers undergoing intense risk-filled separations from family and friends use brands in their communication with distant loved ones. Specifically, we examine the manner in which deployed military and their family and friends utilize brands in their interpersonal communications. Using historical documents, brand promotions that explicitly call upon patriotic military themes, interviews with families that have experienced a military deployment, and online forums for deployed military and their families, we uncover the strategic use of brands within personal communications during intense risk-filled separations. We examine outward facing consumer-brand bonds. We find two basic categories: comfort brands and military endorsed brands. For each of these, there are two consumer brand relationship trajectories: continuing (once begun they are maintained in and out of military service) and contextual (only active during active military service). We find that consumers utilize brands as virtual proxies signifying safety and representing home during intense risk-filled separations. Both consumers at home and those deployed share pictures and stories of shared brands to strengthen bonds and communicate shared safety.

Hope Jensen Schau is the Associate Dean of Eller MBA Programs, and holds the Gary M. Munsinger Chair in Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Marketing at the Eller College of Management, University of Arizona. Hope‘s research focuses on brand building, integrated marketing communications, and the impact of technology on marketplace relationships and collaborative value creation. Her research has been grant funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, the Marketing Science Institute, the Center for Research on Information Technology in Organizations (CRITO), and the McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship. She has published in high profile venues including the Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing, Journal of Retailing, Journal of Advertising, Journal of Consumer Affairs, Journal of Public Policy and Marketing among others.

Consumer Journeys: Take 2

Abstract
Some recent theoretical momentum calls for considering consumer choices as unfolding journeys especially, for example, for analyzing how consumers approach a purchase decision. Journey is an old word that simply means to travel on a trip or voyage. Yet, as a lived experience, a journey embodies rich feelings of surprise, adventure, change, learning, retracing steps-equal parts process and destination with stories to follow. In this conceptual presentation I posit new research questions that come from considering four major consumer action domains as journeys: connections, transformations, transcendence and life narratives. I argue that by examining these action domains not as identify projects, jobs to be done, or even consumer needs, but instead as journeys we uncover new ways of thinking about how brands travel with consumers in their important life journeys. This presentation also serves as a call to action. Rebecca Hamilton and I are editing a special issue of Journal of Academy of Management Science next summer that will focus on Consumer Journeys. We are also organizing a spring 2017 conference in Amsterdam with this theme.

Linda L. Price Is Department Head and Professor of Marketing and Soldwedel Family Fellow in the Department of Marketing, Eller College of Management, University of Arizona, Tucson. Her work has been published in journals such as Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, and Organization Science. She has served as President of the Association of Consumer Research, and was the 2013 winner of the Academy of Marketing Science‘s Cutco Vector Distinguished Marketing Scholar award.

Games, Marketing and Open Innovation

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Date:
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
Time:
10:00am – 12:00pm Presentation & QA
12:00pm – 1:00pm Lunch
Location:
Segal Graduate School
500 Granville Street, Vancouver
Room 2800 (2nd floor)
Inquiries:
Please contact beedie-events@sfu.ca

Market Segmentation and Electronic Games: A View from Brazil

Abstract
This talk deals with the identification of market segments for the electronic games business in Brazil. Surveys reveal the identification of five market segments based on a set of motivational behaviors put forward by the literature as relevant to electronic games playing. The majority of variables were significant both to explain the first dependent variable (intention to play) as to act as mediator for the second dependent variable (intention to pay). The significant variables were used to make segmentation by SOM and ANOVA. Groups of clients are profiled according to five identifying labels: addict hard players, busy hard players, diversity seekers players, bored players and casual players. These findings are helpful for designing games for specific market segments.

Authors: Lucas Lopes,State University of Ceara/Brazil, Ana Augusta Freitas, State University of Ceara/Brazil, Luiz Fernando Heineck, State University of Ceara/Brazil

Dr. Ana Freitas is a Full Professor of the Department of Business at the State University of Ceara, Brazil. She has a Post-Doctorate degree in technology innovation at Fundacao Getulio Vargas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (2011) . Dr. Freitas received her Ph.D. (2000) and her MBA (1995) in Production Management at Federal University of Santa Catarina. In addition, she graduated in Civil Engineering at Federal University of Ceará – Brazil (1992). Dr. Freitas has published and presented papers reflecting her research interests in marketing and innovation. Most of her publications are in Portuguese, in leading management journals in Brazil.

Open Innovation and the Role of Marketing in Organizations

Abstract
Although there are many research articles on open innovation, few have characterized their impacts and challenges.Furthermore. There is even less literature on the theoretical and practical links between open innovation and marketing. Thus, this talk sheds light on this gap  by proposing an analytical framework for future empirical studies that span marketing and open innovation. The framework outlines the role of marketing in the processes of knowledge flow between firms and their exterior environment in an open innovation perspective.

Authors: Marcio Mota, State University of Ceara/Brazil, Samuel Camara, State University of Ceara/Brazil, Ana Augusta Freitas, State University of Ceara/Brazil, Felipe Gerhard Sousa, State University of Ceara/Brazil, Lucas Lopes de Souza, State University of Ceara/Brazil

Dr. Marcio Mota is an Assistant Professor of the Department of Marketing at the State University of Ceara, Brazil. He is a Post-Doctoral Researcher at Fundacao Getulio Vargas, Sao Paulo, Brazil. He was a Visiting Scholar at the Asper School of Business/University of Manitoba and Guest Lecturer at the Aalto University, Finland. Dr. Mota received his Ph.D. in Business/Marketing at University of Fortaleza; he received his MSc in Marketing from State University of Ceara, Brazil, his MBA in Marketing from the State University of Ceara, Brazil and his BBA from the State University of Ceara, Brazil. In addition, he completed three Graduate Diplomas – in Marketing at the State University of Ceara, Brazil, in Technology at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and in Health Business Management from Anhanguera University – Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Technological Mindfulness 

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Abstract
Our relationship with technology is increasingly dependent and ambivalent. It connects families across continents and disconnects them across tables. It shields us from the elements and sunders us from the earth. It frees our minds and imprisons our attention. In this talk we address the following questions: What is our relationship with technology? How can we use technology mindfully and how can we use technology to promote mindfulness? And what can creative communities teach us about how to ‘mind’ technology? We address these questions from both consumer and managerial perspectives.The paper is based on work by Pierre Berthon and Dr. Tamara Rabinovich, of Bentley University, and Ian McCarthy, Jan Kietzman and Leyland Pitt of the Beedie School of Business.
Date:
Thursday, April 21, 2016
Time:
9:00am – 10:30am Presentation & QA
Location:
Segal Graduate School
500 Granville Street, Vancouver
Room 2800 (2nd floor)
Inquiries:
Please contact beedie-events@sfu.ca
PierreBerthon

Pierre Berthon is the Clifford Youse Distinguished Chair of Information Design, Marketing and Strategy in the McCallum Graduate School of Business, Bentley College, Waltham, MA. Formerly on the faculties of University of Bath, University of Cardiff, Henley Management College, UK, and of Columbia University, USA. Berthon is an engineer by training and worked for Lotus Sports Cars. The author of more than 100 papers in scholarly refereed journals, his work has been accepted by publications such as Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Information Systems Research, Sloan Management Review, California Management Review, Technological Forecasting and Social Change and the Journal of Services Research.