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Beedie team takes home hardware at business ethics competition

Sep 26, 2011

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SEATTLE– A team of students from the Beedie School of Business is enjoying the afterglow of a successful journey to Bellevue, Washington to participate in one of North America’s highest-profile business ethics competitions.

The students — Fahad Yasin, Christine Prasad, Sasha Vukovic, Moira van den Akker, and Andrew McKinlay — competed in the LMU/ECOA Intercollegiate Business Ethics Case Competition (IBECC), held in Bellevue, Washington from September 21-22. The team competed against a prestigious international field that included the likes of Oxford, USC, INSEAD, Holy Cross and Boston College.

Among the honours they received was winning the Hannah Arendt Essay Award, funded by the Honorable Judge Ruth Kraft of the New York bench, and recognizing the best essay of the competition about the ethical dimensions of a business case.

The team also took home hardware as 2011 Consolation Winner, securing the team’s ranking in the Top 5 for overall competition, and as first runner-up in the international category.

The five undergraduate students from the Beedie School of Business at Simon Fraser University had used Vancouver’s 2011 Stanley Cup Riot as a case study to examine the growing role that social media plays in society and business.

The team’s chosen ethics case concerned the immediate aftermath of Vancouver’s 2011 Stanley Cup Riot in a human resources context. The team was coached by Sam Thiara, Manager of Student Engagement and Recruitment at the Beedie School of Business, and alumnus Pam Hernandez.

The competition was jointly sponsored by the Center for Ethics and Business at Loyola Marymount University, the Opus College of Business at the University of St. Thomas and the Ethics and Compliance Officer Association (ECOA). The 2011 competition was held at the ECOA’s annual business ethics conference in Bellevue.

Teams in the competition conducted research on a contemporary issue in business ethics of their own choosing and prepared a 20 to 30 minute presentation, which they presented to a panel of 4 or 5 judges.